Tagged: energy

Thomas Bourgeois on keeping power flowing to critical infrastructure following natural disaster 0

Thomas Bourgeois on keeping power flowing to critical infrastructure following natural disaster

Thomas Bourgeois, deputy director of the Pace Energy & Climate Center, is available to speak to the media about keeping power flowing to critical infrastructure following natural disasters like this weekend’s freak snowstorm that left more than 3 million customers in the dark. As this record-setting storm reminded us, we can expect increases in the number and severity of extreme weather events, thanks to climate change—making preparedness ever more essential going forward.

One measure that’s gaining ground recently is on-site Combined Heat and Power (CHP) generators at critical infrastructure sites. They can be configured to run independent of the electrical grid, providing heating, cooling and power to critical facilities during and after an emergency situation. Unlike diesel-based emergency back-up generators, they are used every day, so their reliability in an emergency is assured. CHP generators typically are fueled by natural gas piped in underground, which is resilient to many types of disasters that lead to loss of power.

Pace Law School’s Energy & Climate Center, which is the U.S. Department of Energy’s Northeast Clean Energy Application Center, is working on several projects related to CHP and emergency preparedness.

Pace Energy & Climate Center executive director director on EPA regulating power plant greenhouse gas emissions 0

Pace Energy & Climate Center executive director director on EPA regulating power plant greenhouse gas emissions

Franz Litz, executive director of Pace Law School’s Energy & Climate Center, is available to speak to the media about the Environmental Protection Agency setting greenhouse gas regulations for power plants and refineries. It is expected that EPA will release a new schedule for issuing regulations on Friday, after it missed two previous deadlines in July and September.

“This is EPA’s first real attempt to regulate greenhouse gas emissions from sources other than cars and trucks. This regulation is well overdue. There is a lot at stake for states like those in the Regional Greenhouse Gas Initiative (RGGI) that have already stepped up to reduce emissions from power plants. Now, EPA must follow through to ensure other states do their part. As we enter an election year, EPA should not bow to political pressure.”

Thomas Bourgeois, deputy director of the Pace Energy & Climate Center, on keeping power flowing to critical infrastructure in the wake of natural disaster 0

Thomas Bourgeois, deputy director of the Pace Energy & Climate Center, on keeping power flowing to critical infrastructure in the wake of natural disaster

With utilities along the Eastern Seaboard reporting more than three million customers still without power as of Tuesday morning, many are questioning how we can better prepare for future natural disasters—especially as climate change causes increases in the number and severity of extreme weather events.

Experts at Pace Law School’s Energy & Climate Center are available to speak to the media about keeping power running to critical sites—such as hospitals, centers of refuge, data centers, wastewater treatment plants, and chemical storage facilities—when the grid is impaired in the wake of a natural disaster.

One measure that’s gaining ground recently is on-site Combined Heat and Power (CHP) generators at critical infrastructure sites. They can be configured to run independent of the electrical grid, providing heating, cooling and power to critical facilities during and after an emergency situation. Unlike diesel-based emergency back-up generators, they are used every day, so their reliability in an emergency is assured. CHP generators typically are fueled by natural gas piped in underground, which is resilient to many types of disasters that lead to loss of power.

Jackson Morris, Senior Policy Advisor at the Pace Energy and Climate Center, discusses energy efficiency with The Long Island Press in the story, “New York Passes Historic Green Jobs Financing Law”. 0

Jackson Morris, Senior Policy Advisor at the Pace Energy and Climate Center, discusses energy efficiency with The Long Island Press in the story, “New York Passes Historic Green Jobs Financing Law”.

Jackson Morris, Senior Policy Advisor at the Pace Energy and Climate Center, was quoted in The Long Island Press article, “New York Passes Historic Green Jobs Financing Law.” In 2009, law makers in New York State passed a bill aimed at creating 60,000 jobs to retrofit buildings so that they are more energy efficient. Recently, the State passed an addition to the law, dealing with how the law would be funded, so that the jobs and greener buildings could actually be established.

Morris says, “Enacting this innovative financing mechanism is a major breakthrough for scaling up energy efficiency in New York — policy makers across the nation should take note.”

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