Tagged: free speech

Prof. Bennett Gershman on the rights of protestors to occupy Zuccotti Park 0

Prof. Bennett Gershman on the rights of protestors to occupy Zuccotti Park

Pace Law School Professor Bennett Gershman is available to speak to the media about the police sweep Tuesday morning clearing the protestors out of Zuccotti Park.

“The police action sweeping the Occupy Wall Street protesters out of Zuccotti Park was expected. So were the confrontation and arrests. The protesters’ right to camp out in the park, when balanced against the governmental interest in preventing health and safety hazards, and allowing other people to use the park, made the sweep inevitable, and probably lawful. It is also likely that the aggressive police action will galvanize the movement to protest in other places and in other ways. But one thing is clear: unless overruled by a court, the city won’t allow the protesters to camp out in the park again.”

Prof. John Humbach on SCOTUS decision in Brown v. Entertainment Merchants Association 0

Prof. John Humbach on SCOTUS decision in Brown v. Entertainment Merchants Association

Pace Law School Professor John Humbach, an expert on First Amendment Law, especially as it relates to teenagers, is available to speak to the media about the Supreme Court’s decision in Brown v. Entertainment Merchants Association.

“The central question in Brown v. Entertainment Merchants Association was the extent to which persons under age 18 have the normal constitutional rights of free speech and expression. Reduced to its basics, the issue was whether state government should be able to control what minors see, read, and hear. There is good reason to think that this sort of government control of teenage minds is a generally bad thing, but there are also many people who see value in such control.

Arguably, at least, government should not simply leave the development of teenagers’ personalities, tastes, attitudes, and values to their families, parents and the other people in their lives. Instead, one could say, government exists not just to serve its citizens but to shape them as well….”

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