Tagged: prisons

Prof. Michael Mushlin on Supreme Court ruling on California’s prisons 0

Prof. Michael Mushlin on Supreme Court ruling on California’s prisons

Pace Law School Professor Michael Mushlin, one of the country’s leading authorities on prisons and prison reform, is available to speak to the media about today’s Supreme Court ruling in Brown, Governor of California, et al. v. Plata, et al.

“This is easily the most important case to be decided by the Supreme Court on prison rights law in the last quarter century. Dealing with the largest prison system in the country, it affirms a lower court decision, which orders the release of prisoners if necessary to meet Constitutional standards in the prisons.

This ruling means that the federal courts have not abdicated their responsibility to ensure that Constitutional rights are met no matter how powerless or vulnerable the people. It shows that the American legal system will continue to recognize the humanity of all people including people behind bars.

The opinion sends a message that severe overcrowding cannot be tolerated, even at a time of fiscal crisis. The opinion is a tremendous affirmation of our constitutional system of government and of the rule of law.”

Prof. Mushlin speaks about SCOTUS ruling on prisons 0

Prof. Mushlin speaks about SCOTUS ruling on prisons

“There’s a growing consensus that there are better ways to run criminal justice systems,” Prof. Michael Mushlin, an expert on prison reform and oversight, told the Associated Press following the Supreme Court’s ruling in a major prison case.

The court said in a 5-4 decision that California is required by the Constitution to reduce its cramped prison population by more than 30,000 inmates to correct longstanding violations of inmates’ rights to adequate healthcare.

Read the full story here.

Latest issue of Pace Law Review provides blueprint for critically-needed prison oversight in United States 0

Latest issue of Pace Law Review provides blueprint for critically-needed prison oversight in United States

Offers views from academics, human rights lawyers, and national and international corrections experts.

WHITE PLAINS, NY, December 7, 2010 — The United States has, by far, the highest incarceration rate of any developed country on the planet, yet its prisons remain largely hidden worlds. Unlike many Western countries, which have systems for inspecting and reporting on prison conditions, the U.S. lacks formal and comprehensive external oversight mechanisms to regularly monitor prisons and jails.

Now, a newly released issue of the Pace Law Review, “Opening up a Closed World: A Sourcebook on Prison Oversight,” offers a comprehensive look at prison oversight, including articles from leading academics, national and international corrections experts, and prisoners’ rights and human rights lawyers. Together, this diverse group calls for a national conversation on this important subject, and offers insights and practical ideas for how oversight could be accomplished in the American context.

Skip to toolbar