Tagged: prosecutorial ethics

Professor Bennett Gershman quoted in The Washington Times article, “Federal pension theft not always prosectued”. 0

Professor Bennett Gershman quoted in The Washington Times article, “Federal pension theft not always prosectued”.

Prof. Bennett Gershman discussed the reasons certain cases are turned down for prosecution with The Washington Times in the story, “Federal pension theft not always prosecuted.” Often in cases of pension theft, the suspected individuals admit to taking money, but claim to be unaware that they were not entitled to the money. This can complicate such cases, making them less attractive to prosecutors.

“They don’t have the manpower to take every case. It’s about policy choices. You can’t prosecute every case. You can’t prosecute most cases. So you have to make choices to prosecute wisely,” says Prof. Gershman.

Prof. Bennett Gershman quoted in The Jackson Citizen Patrol article, “‘Misleading’ statement in court tarnishes record of Detective Sgt. Christopher Boulter”. 0

Prof. Bennett Gershman quoted in The Jackson Citizen Patrol article, “‘Misleading’ statement in court tarnishes record of Detective Sgt. Christopher Boulter”.

Prof. Bennett Gershman discussed prosecutorial ethics with The Jackson Citizen Patriot in the story, “‘Misleading statement in court tarnishes the record of Detective Sgt. Christopher Boulter”. In a Michigan felony drug case, a detective made less than truthful statements in a preliminary hearing in order to protect the identity of an informant. The statements, however, were left off of the State’s disclosure, as the leading prosecutor claimed that she was distracted and did not hear the detectives response.

Professor. Gershman says, ““This prosecutor was not honest, and this officer was not honest. That is pretty clear to me.”

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